Duesbury Derby

When John Noakes was a presenter on Blue Peter it was one of the finest periods in the history of Blue Peter. When Jaguar produced the E-type Jaguar it was one of the finest periods in their history and when Kellogg’s Rice Krispies first snapped, crackled and popped onto the shop shelves in 1928 many said it was the best period for the Kellogg company.

Every company has its finest period and the same can be said for the Derby Porcelain Factory.It all began in 1786 when William Duesbury the younger succeeded his father and steered the factory through its best and most significant period. The young William was a multi talented man. He possessed a wonderful eye and an enviable appreciation of the artistic, but almost as important were his very effective managerial skills. Production was aimed at only the wealthiest customers with every piece finished to the very highest standard.

Derby specialised in cabinet wares, particularly cups and saucers or cabaret sets (too expensive to use and produced simply to be admired). Derby’s glaze was creamy white and very soft, producing a delightful and subtle feeling, unlike other English porcelain. Consequently the demand for Derby of this period today is higher than many other porcelains.

The decoration in panels or reserves was created by some superb artists including Zachariah Boreman and Thomas Hill focused on landscapes, Richard Askew famous for figures and William Billingsley, the greatest of all English flower painters. Derby rediscovered the charm of botanical designs and flower prints were also copied onto dessert services.

Sadly William Duesbury died far too soon, at only 34, but he left a factory which had become one of the finest in Europe.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Royal Worcester Animals

There is something just a tiny bit unsettling about walking through a field of cows. Recently, on a hike through the glorious Derbyshire countryside my wife and I found ourselves in just such a field, with the said cows approaching us at what can only be described as a fast gallop. Without hesitation or consultation we both struck up our own gallops and bounded for the safety of the style exit.

The whole exciting experience with our cows meant that the rest of the walk was taken up by me regaling my wife on the wonderful Worcester animal figures championed by Kerr and Binns.

In 1851 W. H. Kerr and R. W. Binns purchased the Worcester company, which had been producing some of the most wonderful wares since the mid 18th century and started a new era in it’s history. The new owners introduced a new material, Parian, into the manufacture of Worcester porcelain. This material was long lasting, more easily coloured and gilded and most importantly very adaptable to produce the detailed modelling that Worcester is valued for in salerooms today.

This naturally led to an expansion in the production and consequently the demand for figurines which up until then had not been a primary element of Worcester sales. They began trading as Worcester Royal Porcelain Company Ltd. in 1862 and employed trained sculptors rather than factory workers to do their modelling.

Royal Worcester Animals are still very popular today. Collectors often collect in series including British Birds, Prized Cattle and Tropical Fish or more exclusive examples such as Netsuke Animals. Alternatively the more devoted collector may collect works by a particular modeller including James Alder, David Fryer or Dorothy Doughty who was most famous for her Bird collections.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Goss Crested Ware

As I drive across this wonderful county of ours in search of the Antique, I listen to all sorts of things in my car. Spotify, library books on line, a somewhat selective approach to radio two, local radio, radio four and radio four extra, to name but a few. Last week I happened to be listening to a program about successful entrepreneurs who have made it very big. It seemed to me that each had a very good starting idea and were in the right place at the right time, but they all had something else. To use an unfortunate phrase, they had an ‘X’ factor.

In the world of the Antique, one such man was Adolphus Goss. Well, Adolphus, bless him, made the most of the late Victorians and their sudden love for seaside travel. He gave them all something to buy and take home from their seaside excursions. He gave them crested ware.

W. H. Goss & Co first produced crested ware in 1888 from their “Falcon Works” pottery in Stoke-on-Trent. A typical piece of Goss crested ware had a white, creamy glaze and a coloured transfer of a Coat of Arms. A genuine Goss has a printed mark, featuring an image of a falcon above the name “W. H. GOSS.” Hundreds of different pieces were made from traditional vases to top hats, clogs and tiny kettles.

The success of their heraldic china souvenir business was huge, with large scale production needed to meet high demand. It is believed that by 1910, approximately 90% of homes had a piece of Goss crested ware adorning their mantelpiece or sideboard. Adolphus Goss built up a huge network of Goss agents across the country to market and sell their crested ware. It began with the up- and-coming seaside resorts, but very quickly every town and city had its arms produced on Goss china ready for the tourist trade.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Collectors Clubs

This week something very exciting occurred. The newspaper contacted me to say we had a letter from an interested reader. What was interesting was that it came from a collectors club and only last week I had written about collecting.

It wasn’t, as it turned out, my most interesting and highly informative missive relating to collecting that had caused our reader to get in touch, but an earlier penned and equally captivating discourse on the joys of Old Hall stainless steel. Now, as it happens, there was an ulterior motive to our interested reader’s contact, but it was non the worse for that.

The messenger wished to draw attention to a specific collectors club. This made me realise that I had missed a very important ingredient which could be used to help bake the perfect collector; the collectors club. These clubs are everywhere and they are a vital link between a novice in his or her collecting field and a seasoned professional.

What was the club our interested reader wanted me to mention? It was a flourishing club for Old Hall, which our intrepid reader runs. The website he gave us was www.oldhallclub.co.uk. Needless to say I went on the website and it takes you through a myriad of useful information for the novice and the seasoned collector.

The moral of the story is, use the collectors clubs. No one knows more about their subject than the gallant founts of knowledge who run these wonderful institutions. From egg cups to fork lift trucks, they are out there. Last week I ended on the worry of boring family and friends with your collection, which in some instances can be a real possibility. That will never happen with a fellow club member.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Collecting

It is many years since I have mentioned my DIY skills, but last weekend they once again came to the fore. My wife had decided that the repositioning of some of our paintings was imperative and so my drill was searched for, dusted off and along with a somewhat frayed extension, plugged in. Unlike many men, I only possess one drill bit and mainly through lack of interest, have never managed to acquire the correct plastic plug to fill the hole in the wall it makes. The result; my holes are a mess and only half of them are successful.

“I think they look fine where they are” I suggested. “Fine” was a silly choice of words and a discussion ensued. My argument was that we should put our efforts into researching some new artists and genres and replacing some of the paintings we have. This, I explained, would be a double helping of joy as we would have the excitement of the sale and the satisfaction of the purchase. I have to say I did well and we are now looking for some new pictures to hang on existing hooks.

The whole episode made me think generally of the joys of collecting. Collecting is different from investing, financial gain is not the object. Pick a subject that is of interest or has always held a fascination. Don’t choose a genre that is so rare examples never appear or one so common the market is flooded. Enjoy the research and always keep the first piece purchased, this will show how far the collection has progressed in the years that follow.The investor is always interested in the perfect example, but the collector is interested in just the example.

The auction room is a wonderful place to expand knowledge and enhance collections. In these present Covid times everything is virtual, but descriptions are still there and bidding is possible, full catalogues with numerous illustrations are available. With fingers crossed, post vaccination, things will get back to normal and that is the time to touch and examine as many examples as possible.

One word of warning. All collectors must learn to recognise when someone is losing interest in the collection they are waxing lyrical about. Nothing is more interesting than hearing an informed collector on a subject that is of interest to the listener. But, nothing is more boring…….

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Candelabra

This Christmas , like many people all over the country, my wife and I will be basking in our own company. For us this will be the first time in our married life this has happened. The question on both our lips has been the same. Do we bring out the candelabra?

Candelabra follow the styles of the candlestick, but they are rare before the late 18th century and if found will generally only have two detachable arms. By the end of the 18th century candelabra are more common and fashion dictated that the number of arms found on their detachable tops increased, initially to three but by the middle of Victoria’s reign five, six and more were common.

The three branch candelabra was a common sight by the end of the 18th century. These were tall and they grew in size until their peak in the Regency period. The decoration, as explained, followed the candlestick and around this time decoration of fluting was enclosed by beaded borders.

It is important to ensure that the decoration of the main body matches that of the detachable branches, therefore ensuring the candelabra is all original and not a marriage of two parts. As in life there are good and bad marriages, but with the candelabra ever a top and bottom living together in complete love and perfect harmony will never be as good as a completely original example.

On the early candelabra the branches could be removed and the central stem used as a candlestick. On later examples this dual usage was impossible because the stems grew too high and the nozzles too wide to hold a candle.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Old Hall Stainless Steel

News of vaccinations beginning for Covid is very exciting for us all and if we cast our minds back almost a year it all started in a research laboratory. We have a lot to thank research laboratories for.

In 1913, Harry Brearley working in a just such an establishment in Sheffield discovered ‘rustless’ steel and became credited as its inventor. Originally stainless steel was developed for use in the military, or for medical equipment and industrial tools but in 1934 it was first advertised for domestic use at the ‘Ideal Home Exhibition’. At that exhibition by far the biggest and best stand was for a company called Old Hall.

William Wiggin, son of James the founder of Old Hall, had been experimenting with stainless steel tableware for some time, making the first stainless steel teapot in 1930. However, gaining support for the products from retailers was difficult and the Ideal Home Exhibition was the final stage in trying to get trade and the public onboard with his new venture.

The appointment of Robert Welch as Design Consultant in 1955 saw changing fortunes for Old Hall. Welch was not only a specialist in Stainless Steel production design trained at the Royal College of Art but had also qualified as a silversmith and his skills as such were evident in his designs. Welch’s work was seen as ‘British contemporary’ and earned him three Design Council awards. His notable designs included the hollow ware for P&O’s Oriana cruise liner as well as Old Hall candlesticks and the Alveston cutlery range which won him one of the awards in 1965.

The height of popularity for Old Hall was the 1960s when it was considered a shining example of first rate modern British craftsmanship. These golden years saw Old Hall found in most homes and possibly one of the most common wedding presents received by happy couples across Britain.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Shelley

Last week I looked at the incredible rise in popularity of 1960s teak furniture and this week I open with the demise in popularity of so many 19th and 20th century porcelain factories. Not however the products emanating from the doors of the Shelley factory, these have always kept their appeal.

The Shelley factory, established in 1872, was first known as Wileman & Co., then as Foley and as Shelley from 1925, becoming Shelley Potteries Ltd. in 1929 and finally Shelley China Ltd. in 1965.

Shelley, under the direction of Art Director, Frederick Rhead, produced a number of hand painted earthenware grotesques, animals and Toby jugs in the 1890s which were deliberately made to look ugly. These achieved great success, but it was not until the 1920s that Shelley pieces achieved their ultimate success. Their high quality Art Deco tableware became famous with the help of a national advertising campaign.

After the Art Deco success came the figures of fairies and other characters, as well as nursery wares based on the illustrations of Mabel Lucie Attwell.

Shelley pieces are always popular in auctions and the two main collecting areas are the Art Deco tea wares and the Mabel Lucie Attwell related pieces, which tend to represent children, the clergy and golfers.

Although Shelley figures are amongst the strangest ever produced they are still very collectable. The most interest tends to be in the chubby cheeked child studies accompanied by fairy folk. Many of these are modelled riding a variety of animals and birds, or standing on toadstools, sometimes with the addition of rabbits.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Ladderax

In the 1960s, when I was a boy in the saleroom, watching my father on the rostrum from inside my brown porters overall, nobody bought second hand pianos. I remember one of my boyhood tasks was to take the ‘Shepherds casters’ from the feet of pianos, before they were sent to their final resting place, because these were very saleable. As I grew, so did the demand for pianos. By middle age demand was strong and prices were high. As I approach late middle age nobody wants pianos again.

This romantic dip into my past life is just to illustrate how the demand for our chattels changes over the years. Put simply, the prevailing fashion trends influence the values of our antiques and collectables.

Before the well known downturn in demand for the ‘brown furniture’ of the Victorian era, nobody wanted to buy second hand teak in any shape or form. Now, however, the large mirror backed sideboard our grandparents polished within an inch of its Victorian life, is replaced in our affections with the low sleek lines of 1960s teak.

Almost more popular today than the low sleek sideboard of the 1960s, is the same period’s version of today’s Ikea shelving, Ladderax. What a great seller that is, everybody loves it. In short it is shelving, but shelving like never before, designed and created by Robert Heal in 1964. As the name suggests it consists of a collection of upright ladders. These then support shelves and cupboards on steel supporting rods, threaded horizontally in any desired combination. Hence the final look of your ladderax wall unit is an individually designed triumph. What more could an upwardly mobile 1960s house owner wish for.

Upwardly mobile or laid back relaxed, furniture from that wonderful period of my school days is back with a vengeance.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Music Boxes

I love listening to music. Anything from opera to punk, I love almost all of it. With the exception of a small vinyl collection my wife has, all this music is on my mobile phone. I find that absolutely amazing and incredibly convenient. I wonder if 18th century man found the music box just as amazing.

Musical mechanisms were first fitted in Swiss clocks and automata in the 17th century. However, the musical box, which was either powered by clockwork or operated by a handle, came into being in its own right in the 18th century. It comprised of a rotating cylinder that produced sound when raised pins plucked a row of fine steel teeth on a comb-like metal plate.

By the 19th century the musical box was firmly established as an affordable form of entertainment and was produced in large numbers. As techniques improved, seven or eight tunes could be set on one cylinder. The cylinders were housed in wooden boxes, often with plain sides and decoratively inlaid tops. The better the box, usually the better the mechanism was with more special effects like butterfly bells, cymbals and drums. Specialist makers like Nicole Freres also add value to a musical box sold in today’s mechanical market place.

The problem with the music box was that the cylinder could only hold so many pins and thus the number and complexity of the tunes, or “airs”, was limited. A simple, often rather basic model
( like a car without satellite navigation) would have less pins in the cylinder and so play fewer and simpler tunes. These are today the lower value models which can be purchased for much less.

A more complicated model with many multiple pin tunes together with bells, drums and cymbals by a maker like Nicole Freres will be at the other end of the money scale.

As a final thought, if contemplating the purchase of one of these beautiful boxes, always view with your ears.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.