Cornish Kitchenware

This summer, being the summer of staycation for many, seems to be the summer of grandparentscation for all Dowses and their offsprings. There is a saying, well known I believe, that it is possible to get “too much of a good thing”. I think we may have reached that point, especially as two of our Cornish Kitchen Ware jars have bitten the proverbial dust during these many “…cations”.

True Cornishware was produced by T.G. Green of Church Gresley in Derbyshire from the 1920s onwards. The name is said to have come from one of the employees who, on returning from holiday in Cornwall, saw the new range and said that the blue was like the Cornish skies and the white was like crests of Cornish waves.

By the 1980s Cornishware had declined in popularity and the rights to make it were sold to Cloverleaf of Swindon and in 2001 to Mason Cash and Co.

Maker’s marks on the base aid identification and dating. Early marks from the 1920-1940s are printed in green. Most original Cornishware bears a printed mark in green or black, showing the church at Church Gresley and is crossed by the words ‘Cornish Kitchen Ware’.

Named jars are more collectable than plain jars and rare names like ‘Lard’ and ‘Meal’ are even more desirable. Always check the name is not a later addition. Although blue and white is the most common colour others were produced. Red is by far the rarest, because it was produced as an experiment in the 1960s and never went into full production.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Suzie Cooper

Recently, during a house contents valuation I was conducting for Probate purposes in Clay Cross, near Chesterfield, I came across one of the most extensive collections of Susie Cooper ceramics I have ever seen. I have always been a take it or leave it sort of chap when it comes to Susie Cooper, but when i saw her talent en masse I have to say my opinion changed to one of admiration.

Susie Cooper was one of the most successful designers of the twentieth century. Born in 1902, she joined local potter A. E. Gray & Co. Ltd to gain the experience she required to attend London’s Royal College of Art. Initially Cooper was a production line painter, but her talent was quickly spotted and instead of going to London she became a designer at Gray’s.

Cooper was influenced by many artists, but her contribution to the company was highly personal. Gray’s used the factory mark “Designed by Susie Cooper” to identify her work and this early work of flowers and chintzware is still very popular with collectors.

By 1929 Susie Cooper had left Gray’s and set up on her own in premises at the Chelsea Works, Burslem. Products made after her departure from Gray’s are marked “A Susie Cooper Production”. However, in 1931, after interest from Wood & Sons, she moved to a larger studio at their Crown Works and products were then marked with the familiar leaping deer, that is most often associated with her.

The 1930s were the most dazzling years for Cooper and the high demand for her work led to her use of lithography at a time when most firms were still using mechanical decoration.

By the late 1930s Susie Cooper was producing up to 200 new designs a year, featuring banding, polka dots and stylised flowers. Patterns that were both modern and timeless such as “Patricia Rose” and “Endon” were the key to her success, appealing to a far wider audience than the work of many of her contemporaries.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Belleek

The brown patches on our lawn are getting bigger. Other gardeners in the village seem to feel now is the time to seed, so in an attempt to cover our patches, I have decided to do the same. Along with general DIY, gardening and lawn management are not really my forte, so we shall be watching my project with interest. Fortunately the neighbours cannot see it, so failure, which is reasonably likely, can stay within the family.

I mention my lawn because it links beautifully to this weeks topic. The country known to have the greenest lawns is Ireland and Ireland is the home of the wonderful and under collected Belleek porcelain.

Image courtesy of Belleek Porcelain

The Belleek porcelain factory in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland was established in the village of Belleek in the late 1850s by three men. John Caldwell Bloomfield, to whom the land had been left, and two businessmen Robert William Armstrong, an architect from London with an interest in ceramics, and a trader from Dublin, David McBirney. As well as local workers and apprentices the partners hired fourteen experienced men from Stroke-on-Trent.

The partners always wanted to make fine porcelain, but the early pieces to come out of the factory were items such as floor tiles and tableware. However, following a few failed attempts they succeeded in making a certain amount of parian by 1863. Belleek is popular for it’s parian wares. They did not decorate the pieces with transfer printing or painting but instead used lustre glazes to enhance the cream colour of the porcelain itself. The intricate baskets produced by the factory are some of the most popular items with collectors.

By 1865 the company already had a growing market in Ireland and England and was beginning to export items further afield to the United States and elsewhere. Queen Victoria was even a customer.

Although the factory is still in operation today, it is still the early pieces that collectors crave.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.