Table Lamps

The spot lights in our bathroom have been failing at an alarming rate lately and this has resulted in a visit to a well know DIY store. After being assured by an assistant that the new bulb I chose would ‘probably’ fit (a stance confirmed by his superior), I hurried home with enough bulbs to bring light into our darkness.

I replaced the missing bulb, which fitted, but emitted a curious yellow glow in contrast to the three working white bulbs. Undeterred by this setback I battled on. The next failed bulb proved more difficult to extract and I broke the fitting, which now hangs in darkness some inches from the ceiling. I also broke the third fitting, but managed to change the bulb, so that hangs fully lit roughly the same distance from the ceiling. Unfortunately I was not allowed to continue.

This whole sorry tale reinforces the beauty of the table lamp and the uncomplicated ease with which a bulb can be replaced. In the late 1870s Thomas Edison and Joseph Swan both produced their own versions of the light bulb and by the turn of the century the electric table lamp was an item.

The beauty of the table lamp is in the shade and classic designers like Tiffany, Lalique and Gallé all produced some wonderful Art Nouveau and Art Deco lamp shades. A table lamp can transform the ambience of a room and a shade from these and other talented designers styled with overlay or leaded glass or incorporating differing reflective techniques can transform it even more.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Thomas Sheraton

My wife and I have just had new windows fitted. That is windows to the property in which we live, rather than new lenses to our spectacles. Now, we love our new windows and we marvel at the speed and efficiency with which they were fitted, but sadly it has caused my wife to suffer a relapse in a condition I have been managing to keep under control, with careful nurturing, for many months. Namely her “let’s change the room round” affliction.

As with most wives, once her bonnet has entertained a bee there is little anyone can do. However I have to say that on this occasion the moving of an Edwardian inlaid mahogany display cabinet to another location in the room has caused me to fall in love with the piece all over again.

The Edwardian period was the host to many different styles, including the wonderful Arts and Crafts and the inspirational Art Nouveau, but our lately unloved display cabinet is an often forgotten gem from Edward VII’s time in office, namely Revival Sheraton.

Thomas Sheraton was a very gifted designer, born in Stockton-on-Tees in 1751, who designed some wonderful neoclassical style furniture between the 1780s and 1820s. Also during that time he published two ground breaking books, “The Cabinet Dictionary” and “Cabinet Makers and Upholsterer’s Drawing Book”, illustrating his designs.

Our display cabinet typifies the Sheraton style, with delicate neoclassical lines, contrasting wood inlays and a beauty, which thank goodness, we love again. If only everyone else could see the joy of Sheraton what a revival the furniture market would experience.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Brown Furniture

For years, in fact since it dropped so disastrously and disappointingly out of fashion, I have been championing the case for poor old brown furniture. During my daily round of valuations I can often be heard sympathising with owners over the slump in brown furniture values, but can always, always be heard saying, “give it time and the values will rally”.

Well, it is now official, brown furniture is on its way back into the hearts and minds of the young and upwardly mobile designers and what is more, the glossy magazines have the story. Last weekend a national newspaper, whose political persuasions I will not mention, ran an informative article on the “beauty of buying brown” and it’s reviving popularity.

The quality of workmanship, the beauty of shape and form and the colour of the wonderfully matured and polished woods of the antique has never been in doubt. It’s just not been in fashion for the last ten or twenty years.

On a personal level, it could be said that any revival in the fortunes of antique furniture is irrelevant because, since I was a schoolboy in my father’s saleroom I have loved brown furniture and whatever it is worth I always will. For investors, salerooms, antique dealers and present owners however, this can only be excellent news.

I finish on a cautionary note. Because glossy magazines and upwardly mobile designers advocate the revival, doesn’t mean it will happen overnight. It does mean, though, that it will happen, so watch this space.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Breakfast Wares

My father always ate Cornflakes for breakfast. As a young boy I always looked on this as a sign of manhood and vowed to grow up a strong, Cornflake eating man. Sleeping over at a friends one night I remember appearing at the breakfast table to discover his father eating Rice Krispies. He was never the same man in my eyes after that and my friendship with his son soon waned.

In 1894 Dr John Kellogg, who ran a sanatorium, by accident created the corn flake as he attempted to improve the diet of his patients. A patent was applied for that same year and the flakes of corn became so popular that Dr John’s brother Will Keith Kellogg set up the Kellogg Company to produce Corn Flakes and sell to the general public.

In 1906 Will and John fell out over sugar which Will wanted to put in the Cornflakes. Sadly, this led to a life time rift and the success of the company was left to Will Kellogg.

The Cornflake craze didn’t happen overnight, but by the 1930s a change in breakfasting habits was definitely happening. The great British public now required new ceramics to enjoy the first meal of a new day. Cereal bowls, toast racks, teapots and for the lucky ones, all on a tray to be served in bed.

These breakfast wares are popular collectors items today. Look for investable designers like Clarice Cliff and Susie Cooper and the rarer the pattern, the more exciting the purchase.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

The Newlyn School

In 1890, John MacKenzie founded the Newlyn Industrial Class in Newlyn, Cornwall. Along with other talented local artists, he took on unemployed fishermen and taught them to work with copper. John Pearson, co-founder of the Guild of Handicraft (1888), came to work with him at Newlyn in 1882. As a master craftsman, he was the man who taught the men their skills while MacKenzie supplied the majority of the early designs.

Newlyn used the ancient craft of repousse; the process where copper plate is laid on a bed of pitch or lead and hammered from the back to create designs. It is understood that the practice of beating on lead instead of pitch was actually devised by Pearson himself and was a trade secret of the Newlyn School for many years.

Newlyn is not always easy to recognize as not all pieces were stamped. The stamp used was generally the name ‘NEWLYN’ although there are six or possibly seven different variations on this stamp size and occasionally pieces bear other marks such as a date or designers name or the phrase ‘Newlyn Industrial Class Penzance’. Newlyn made a huge variety of things from domestic items such as dishes, trays and coffee pots to more decorative items like vases, panels and picture frames.

Designs largely featured marine subjects such as fish, crabs and seaweed but birds, fruit, landscapes and flowers also feature. One of the great appeals of Newlyn copper is the high quality craftsmanship, which incorporates quality of construction as well as brilliant design. Particular attention was paid to hinges and seams, which is in keeping with the Arts and Crafts movement thinking that construction should be part of the decorative features of any piece.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Goldscheider Figurines

Last weekend’s sunny Sunday found me lying on my deck chair, my eyes closed and listening to the soothing sounds of birds singing and bees buzzing, along with the gentle ‘clip, clip’ of my wife’s hedge cutting endeavours. My thoughts turned, as they so often do in similar settings, to Goldscheider figures.

The Goldscheider Porcelain Manufacturer and Majolica Factory was founded in Vienna in 1885 by Freidrich Goldscheider. It quickly earned itself international acclaim becoming one of the leading ceramics companies in Europe opening branches in Paris, Florence, Leipzig and Berlin. Freidrich worked with his sons Walter and Marcell who would later move to America and England respectively to continue expanding the business after Hilter’s regime forced the family to flee Austria in 1938.

The Goldscheider factories are probably the most well known of the potteries who made the beautiful Art Deco figurines that were so popular in the 1920s and 30s. The figurines depicted elegant, slim-lined and fashionable ladies typically displayed in movement, whether it was mid-dance, an acrobatic stance or simply a sweeping gesture, with dramatic curves that allowed their flowing dresses and sleeves to produce eye-catching, decorative features for the pieces.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse
Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

The large flat areas of the extended dresses, scarves or sleeves were decorated with intricate, colourful designs that contrasted with the light, porcelain-like skin tones of the women. A high quality of detail and skill in the artwork as well as a characterful and appealing face all add value to these figurines. Erotic subjects are particularly popular. Damage or poor restoration can dramatically reduce desirability and thus value.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Costume Jewellery

Costume jewellery made from non precious materials is often more evocative of its age than precious jewels. Worn since antiquity when the Romans excelled at glass imitation gemstones, this “secondary” jewellery exhibits impeccable craftsmanship and clever use of strong period style at relatively low cost. Costume jewellery sold now usually dates from the late 18th, 19th and 20th centuries and is by and large British or European.

Jewellery set with cut and polished lead glass in imitation of gemstones was first created in France in the 1730s by the jeweller Georges Frederic Stress. This paste jewellery was often cut and backed with foil to give colour and depth and then set in silver in dish like coilet settings. These jewels were popular in France and Britain and in Spain they were even worn in court. Paste jewellery is very collectable and reasonably priced, although Georgian paste is considerably more valuable than the mid to late Victorian examples and will always realise higher prices, especially the earrings.

Pinchbeck, which is an alloy of copper and zinc, was invented around 1720 by the English watchmaker, Christopher Pinchbeck, as a substitute for gold. It was the perfect partner for paste, as it could be intricately chased, engraved and coloured just like fashionable gold work. Popular. designs included wide mesh bracelets, muff chains and hair ornaments. Other imitations exist but genuine Pinchbeck is characterised by its rich burnished colour and matt surface.

Later 19th century gilt metal, often erroneously called Pinchbeck, was ideal for less expensive versions of fashionably extravagant jewellery, lockets, bracelets and brooches.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Candelabra

Twice each year I think about the candelabra, once at Christmas and once at Easter. Both are times of celebrating and what better way to celebrate anything than to bring out the candelabra.

Candelabra follow the styles of the candlestick, but they are rare before the late 18th century and if found will generally only have two detachable arms. By the end of the 18th century candelabra
are more common and fashion dictated that the number of arms found on their detachable tops increased, initially to three but by the middle of Victoria’s reign five, six and more were common.

The three branch candelabra was a common sight by the end of the 18th century. These were tall and they grew in size until their peak in the Regency period. The decoration, as explained, followed the candlestick and around this time decoration of fluting was enclosed by beaded borders.

It is important to ensure that the decoration of the main body matches that of the detachable branches, therefore ensuring the candelabra is all original and not a marriage of two parts. As in life there are good and bad marriages, but with the candelabra ever a top and bottom living together in complete love and perfect harmony will never be as good as a completely original example.

On the early candelabra the branches could be removed and the central stem used as a candlestick. On later examples this dual usage was impossible because the stems grew too high and the nozzles too wide to hold a candle.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Lalique Perfume Bottles

Many women, my wife included, love perfume and almost as many women love and are attracted to the bottle containing that (to most men) rather expensive liquid. That in a nutshell is why Rene Lalique was so successful.

Rene Lalique (1860-1945) began his career designing jewellery, he began working with glass in the 1890s and opened his first glass shop in Paris on the famous place Vendôme in 1905. His work caught the eye of perfumer Franҫois Coty who has a shop nearby and Coty invited Lalique into a partnership initially designing labels for his perfumes and later the glass bottles. Their partnership revolutionised the perfume industry; it was the first time perfumes were packaged in distinctive bottles evocative of the fragrance contained within and it was a huge success. By the 1920s Lalique has three factories and produced exquisite perfume bottles for over 60 fashionable and desirable perfumers.

A Lalique Glass Scent Bottle and Stopper, modelled in the 'Deux Fleurs' design, in a clear and frosted glass, engraved mark 'Lalique France' and original label - Estimate £50 to £70. This will be going through our Antique & Fine Art auction next Friday (23rd March)
A Lalique Glass Scent Bottle and Stopper, modelled in the ‘Deux Fleurs’ design, in a clear and frosted glass, engraved mark ‘Lalique France’ and original label – Estimate £50 to £70. This will be going through our Antique & Fine Art auction next Friday (23rd March)

The perfume bottles in highest demand now are the more unusual or abstract with inventive designs and forms. Most bottles had modern and stylized designs following the Art Deco style. Early examples feature more flowing lines, floral
designs and figural etching. Some bottles were formed in bold shapes with oversized decorative stoppers, occasionally more than one stopper could be designed for a bottle.

Bottles that are sealed with their original contents remaining or bottles with their original outer packaging still intact are considerably more valuable and thus more popular amongst collectors. Bottles made or designed after 1945 will not feature the initial “R” in their mark as this was never used after Rene Lalique’s death. The “R” is often added to later pieces to make them appear earlier and thus more desirable.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Make Your Valentine Sparkle!

Sheffield Auction Gallery’s forthcoming Auction of Antique, Vintage & Modern, Fine & Costume Jewellery on Thursday 25th January includes a large selection of diamond and gem set rings.

With estimates ranging from as little as £50 there is something to suit every budget.

An engagement, anniversary, special gift or just because, there is something on offer for everyone to suit every taste – antique, vintage or modern.

Antique, Vintage & Modern, Fine & Costume Jewellery Auction
Thursday 25th January at 2.30pm

On view – Wednesday 24th January 9am-4:45pm and Sale day from 8:30am

Sheffield Auction Gallery, Windsor Road, Heeley, Sheffield S8 8UB

For further information or to consign entries in to future auctions, please contact specialist valuer Sarah Clark or by calling 0114 281 6161 or by visiting our website.