Breakfast Wares

Between us, my wife and I have five siblings. We are in the fortunate position of, not only being on speaking terms with all of them, but actually being on very friendly terms with all of them. Having spent, what seems like a lifetime dealing with deceased estates I have sadly met many families where this is not the case. I always find it very sad when families are no longer friends.

At the beginning of the twentieth century a very famous family had a very famous disagreement. Let me take you back to 1894 and introduce Dr John Kellogg, who ran a sanatorium. Amazingly and completely by accident he created the corn flake as he attempted to improve the diet of his patients. Sensibly he applied for a patent that same year and all in the proverbial sanatorium garden was rosy.

Now, those wonderful flakes of corn became so popular that Dr John’s brother, Will Keith Kellogg, set up the Kellogg Company to produce Corn Flakes and sell them to the general public. Then, unfortunately, it happened. In 1906 Will and John fell out over sugar which Will wanted to put in the Cornflakes and unbelievably this led to a life time rift and the success of the company was left to Will Kellogg.

Even though the Cornflake craze didn’t happen overnight, slowly and by the 1930s a change in breakfasting habits was definitely happening. The great British public now required new ceramics to enjoy the first meal of a new day. Cereal bowls, toast racks, teapots and for the lucky ones, all on a tray to be served in bed.

These breakfast wares are popular collectors items today, especially investable designers like Clarice Cliff and Susie Cooper. The rarer the pattern, the more exciting the purchase.

What a shame it was that the Kellogg brothers couldn’t have stayed friends and marvelled together how their simple flakes of corn were influencing Britain’s pottery designs.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Duesbury Derby

When John Noakes was a presenter on Blue Peter it was one of the finest periods in the history of Blue Peter. When Jaguar produced the E-type Jaguar it was one of the finest periods in their history and when Kellogg’s Rice Krispies first snapped, crackled and popped onto the shop shelves in 1928 many said it was the best period for the Kellogg company.

Every company has its finest period and the same can be said for the Derby Porcelain Factory.It all began in 1786 when William Duesbury the younger succeeded his father and steered the factory through its best and most significant period. The young William was a multi talented man. He possessed a wonderful eye and an enviable appreciation of the artistic, but almost as important were his very effective managerial skills. Production was aimed at only the wealthiest customers with every piece finished to the very highest standard.

Derby specialised in cabinet wares, particularly cups and saucers or cabaret sets (too expensive to use and produced simply to be admired). Derby’s glaze was creamy white and very soft, producing a delightful and subtle feeling, unlike other English porcelain. Consequently the demand for Derby of this period today is higher than many other porcelains.

The decoration in panels or reserves was created by some superb artists including Zachariah Boreman and Thomas Hill focused on landscapes, Richard Askew famous for figures and William Billingsley, the greatest of all English flower painters. Derby rediscovered the charm of botanical designs and flower prints were also copied onto dessert services.

Sadly William Duesbury died far too soon, at only 34, but he left a factory which had become one of the finest in Europe.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Royal Worcester Animals

There is something just a tiny bit unsettling about walking through a field of cows. Recently, on a hike through the glorious Derbyshire countryside my wife and I found ourselves in just such a field, with the said cows approaching us at what can only be described as a fast gallop. Without hesitation or consultation we both struck up our own gallops and bounded for the safety of the style exit.

The whole exciting experience with our cows meant that the rest of the walk was taken up by me regaling my wife on the wonderful Worcester animal figures championed by Kerr and Binns.

In 1851 W. H. Kerr and R. W. Binns purchased the Worcester company, which had been producing some of the most wonderful wares since the mid 18th century and started a new era in it’s history. The new owners introduced a new material, Parian, into the manufacture of Worcester porcelain. This material was long lasting, more easily coloured and gilded and most importantly very adaptable to produce the detailed modelling that Worcester is valued for in salerooms today.

This naturally led to an expansion in the production and consequently the demand for figurines which up until then had not been a primary element of Worcester sales. They began trading as Worcester Royal Porcelain Company Ltd. in 1862 and employed trained sculptors rather than factory workers to do their modelling.

Royal Worcester Animals are still very popular today. Collectors often collect in series including British Birds, Prized Cattle and Tropical Fish or more exclusive examples such as Netsuke Animals. Alternatively the more devoted collector may collect works by a particular modeller including James Alder, David Fryer or Dorothy Doughty who was most famous for her Bird collections.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Goss Crested Ware

As I drive across this wonderful county of ours in search of the Antique, I listen to all sorts of things in my car. Spotify, library books on line, a somewhat selective approach to radio two, local radio, radio four and radio four extra, to name but a few. Last week I happened to be listening to a program about successful entrepreneurs who have made it very big. It seemed to me that each had a very good starting idea and were in the right place at the right time, but they all had something else. To use an unfortunate phrase, they had an ‘X’ factor.

In the world of the Antique, one such man was Adolphus Goss. Well, Adolphus, bless him, made the most of the late Victorians and their sudden love for seaside travel. He gave them all something to buy and take home from their seaside excursions. He gave them crested ware.

W. H. Goss & Co first produced crested ware in 1888 from their “Falcon Works” pottery in Stoke-on-Trent. A typical piece of Goss crested ware had a white, creamy glaze and a coloured transfer of a Coat of Arms. A genuine Goss has a printed mark, featuring an image of a falcon above the name “W. H. GOSS.” Hundreds of different pieces were made from traditional vases to top hats, clogs and tiny kettles.

The success of their heraldic china souvenir business was huge, with large scale production needed to meet high demand. It is believed that by 1910, approximately 90% of homes had a piece of Goss crested ware adorning their mantelpiece or sideboard. Adolphus Goss built up a huge network of Goss agents across the country to market and sell their crested ware. It began with the up- and-coming seaside resorts, but very quickly every town and city had its arms produced on Goss china ready for the tourist trade.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Shelley

Last week I looked at the incredible rise in popularity of 1960s teak furniture and this week I open with the demise in popularity of so many 19th and 20th century porcelain factories. Not however the products emanating from the doors of the Shelley factory, these have always kept their appeal.

The Shelley factory, established in 1872, was first known as Wileman & Co., then as Foley and as Shelley from 1925, becoming Shelley Potteries Ltd. in 1929 and finally Shelley China Ltd. in 1965.

Shelley, under the direction of Art Director, Frederick Rhead, produced a number of hand painted earthenware grotesques, animals and Toby jugs in the 1890s which were deliberately made to look ugly. These achieved great success, but it was not until the 1920s that Shelley pieces achieved their ultimate success. Their high quality Art Deco tableware became famous with the help of a national advertising campaign.

After the Art Deco success came the figures of fairies and other characters, as well as nursery wares based on the illustrations of Mabel Lucie Attwell.

Shelley pieces are always popular in auctions and the two main collecting areas are the Art Deco tea wares and the Mabel Lucie Attwell related pieces, which tend to represent children, the clergy and golfers.

Although Shelley figures are amongst the strangest ever produced they are still very collectable. The most interest tends to be in the chubby cheeked child studies accompanied by fairy folk. Many of these are modelled riding a variety of animals and birds, or standing on toadstools, sometimes with the addition of rabbits.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Ming Porcelain

Ming porcelain is always worth a small fortune. Such a bold statement and so wrong. It is however, a view very commonly held. Why is it incorrect?

To begin with the Ming Dynasty lasted from 1386 to 1644, which is almost 300 years, a very long time to produce an awful lot of pots. But an enormous amount of Ming porcelain is poor quality, provincially produced and naively painted and this together with the fact that they have no reign mark, adversely affects their value.

Taking the “reign” mark a step further, for a piece to have high value it must be a “mark” and “period” piece. The mark is the reign mark on a piece and is composed of symbols that denote emperors. These marks can easily be researched and identified.

The problem is the period. The habit of putting earlier reign marks on Chinese porcelain is common and was practiced for hundreds of years. It is not unusual, therefore, to find an 18th century item with a 15th century mark.

An item made during the reign of the emperor whose mark is on the base is referred to as “mark and period” and the value is often increased twofold or threefold. Better quality pieces which are mark and period are very much rarer than the provincial Ming and are highly prized by collectors.

These highly prized pieces are highly priced and that is the sort of piece people refer to when they ask expectantly “is it Ming?”

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Motto Ware

Last night, as part of our life on the edge lifestyle, my wife an I were watching a re-run episode from the Vicar of Dibley series and somebody said “better a flawed diamond than a flawless pebble”. I thought it was a wonderful motto and tried to recall ever having seen it on a piece of Motto Ware.

Motto Ware was first introduced at Aller Vale, near Newton Abbott. The Aller Vale Pottery was founded in 1881 by John Philips.

Motto Ware is essentially everyday household items inscribed with light hearted sayings and rhyming mottos, often extolling the virtues of hard work and sober living. All production was without mechanisation, the clay was dug locally, the Pottery hand thrown on a wheel and the paints and glazes made on the premises.

A typical piece of Motto Ware will have a yellow slip ground covering most of the piece, leaving edges, spouts and handles in the dark brown slip. The most common pattern is the “Scandy” pattern, which is highly coloured stylised feathers. Sgraffito is the name given to the pattern which forms the letters of the motto. It simply means scratching through the yellow slip to form the letters.

Motto Ware was made until the mid 20th century. Examples are fairly easy to find and generally they are undervalued. An investment opportunity awaits the collector perhaps?

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Clarice Cliff

One of my favourite designers and, due to our generational differences, someone I have never met, is Clarice Cliff. I have written about her more than once over the many years of my weekly missive and I have, I am sure said rare shapes, rare patterns and rare colours are by far the most expensive of her products. I have also said that the mundane pieces never attract a great deal of interest.

However, I have never really discussed Clarice herself. What an amazing woman she was. Unlike her four sisters Sara, Hannah, Dorothy and Ethel, Clarice had a goal for herself and she was determined to achieve it.

At the age of 17, due to a shortage of workers caused by the First World War, Clarice Cliff began a job as an apprentice lithographer with the A J Wilkinson factory in Burslem. Here she began to learn the techniques of modelling, gilding and decorating. The girls who worked with Clarice at this time recalled that she was never really one of them. When they left for home Clarice stayed behind practicing and modelling because she regarded her work as more than just a job.

For a female to become a designer in the 1920’s was really unheard of and it was largely due to her incredibly strong personality, amazing talent and her association with one of the Shorter brothers who owned the factory.

When the brothers purchased Newport Pottery, the adjoining factory to their own, Colley Shorter quickly recognised Clarice Cliffs talents. He became her protector, her sponsor, and her lover. By 1927 he had set her up in her own small studio and on 21st December 1940 he married her.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Goldscheider Figurines

The Goldscheider Porcelain Manufacturer and Majolica Factory was founded in Vienna in 1885 by Freidrich Goldscheider. It quickly earned itself international acclaim becoming one of the leading ceramics companies in Europe opening branches in Paris, Florence, Leipzig and Berlin. Freidrich worked with his sons Walter and Marcell who would later move to America and England respectively to continue expanding the business after Hilter’s regime forced the family to flee Austria in 1938.

The Goldscheider factories are probably the most well known of the potteries who made the beautiful Art Deco figurines that were so popular in the 1920s and 30s. The figurines depicted elegant, slim-lined and fashionable ladies typically displayed in movement, whether it was mid-dance, an acrobatic stance or simply a sweeping gesture, with dramatic curves that allowed their flowing dresses and sleeves to produce eye-catching, decorative features for the pieces.

The large flat areas of the extended dresses, scarves or sleeves were decorated with intricate, colourful designs that contrasted with the light, porcelain-like skin tones of the women. A high quality of detail and skill in the artwork as well as a characterful and appealing face all add value to these figurines. Erotic subjects are particularly popular. Damage or poor restoration can dramatically reduce desirability and thus value.

Many talented designers worked with Goldscheider at this time and work by two of the best, Stefan Dakon and Josef Lorenzl is particularly desirable. Dakon and Lorenzl worked on a huge range of these stylish and stylised women, working not just in ceramics but also in the more desirable and expensive bronze and ivory.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Royal Dux

My wife loves elephants. I have nothing against the elephant and as our home is covered with them, I have little choice. I have to admit that some of the models are really quite lovely, especially those from Duchov.

In 1853 in the town of Duchov a factory was founded and the story of Royal Dux began. After several years of producing utility ceramics the factory was bought by Eduard Eichler and became E Eichler Thonwaren Fabrik. Success followed with the production of terracotta, faience and majolica items, winning a Silver award at the 1878 Paris Exhibition.

A pink triangle became the trademark in 1900.The raised triangle has an acorn in the centre with the inscription ‘Royal Dux Bohemia’, which is still used today.

The Art Nouveau and the Vienna Secession were probably the most successful periods for Royal Dux production. The company won awards in Exhibitions in Milan, Liberec and St. Louis, having representatives and showrooms all over Europe.

The Art Nouveau production is the most collected period. Pieces from this period are very recognisable with their fleshy colourings and attention to facial detail. Classically modelled maidens abound, along with shell shaped vases and bowls, elephants, dogs and Arab figures on camels and horses.

The World Wars affected production, output ceased in the first war and in the second, the German government took over. After the war it was taken over by the new communist government of Czechoslovakia, but today it is privately owned.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website