Chelsea Porcelain

We have had our kitchen modernised. Actually we have had it practically rebuilt. To carry out this exciting rebuild has cost five or six times the price of our first house. Obviously we bought that house many moons ago and everything is relative, but I sincerely hope we will never need another kitchen.

Our previous kitchen incorporated a formal dining area, accessed through an arch and furnished in oak and it contained a pair of my late parents Chelsea figures, a gorgeous pair, but heavily restored. The new kitchen is all kitchen, apparently this is the way to live these days, so I wonder what will become of the Chelsea figures.

Chelsea Porcelain is very clearly divided into four periods defined by the marks used. The first period; the triangle period (1745-49) saw pieces marked with an incised triangle. Wares from this period have a glassy white body due to a proportion of crushed lead glass in the soft paste that can appear to have ‘pinholes’ in it when held to the light. Designs tended to be based on silver work with particular Rococo influence.

By the raised anchor period (1749-52) marked with an applied anchor on a small oval medallion, there had been some improvement in the quality of the glaze with less translucency. Many designs had a Meissen influence and scenes from Aesop’s Fables were popular. A small red or occasionally brown anchor defined the Red anchor period (1752-56) which saw fashions favour decorative tableware with designs such as fruit, animals and vegetables becoming popular. Figures from this period are particularly notable; the best produced by Flemish modeller Josef Willems. Finally the Gold anchor period (1757-69) where the small anchor was now painted gold saw an increased use of gilding and coloured grounds, the return to Rococo designs and many more elaborate figures produced.

In 1769 the factory was sold to William Duesbury of the Derby Porcelain factory and until 1784 produced Chelsea-Derby porcelain. In 1784 the Chelsea workshops were demolished with the majority of the moulds destroyed.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Toby Jugs

Once upon a time many years ago, when ‘horse power’ referred to how many horses pulled your coach and the tricorn hat rather than the baseball cap was the ‘go to’ choice for headgear, there lived a man called Henry Elwes.

Now Henry, even amongst his closest friends, had a reputation for being miserable. He was the king of miserable a short, fat man with dirty lanky hair and he held a record for drinking two thousand pints of Stingo. Stingo was very strong ale, but unfortunately there are no records to say how long it took Henry to drink all those pints. It matters not, however, how long it took, the mere fact it was drunk gave Henry Elwes the nickname Toby Fillpot.

There are many claims to the origin of the Toby jug, but one of the most convincing is that it is based on poor old Toby Fillpot. This is further backed by the work of a publisher Carington Bowles, who in 1761 published illustrations of a short, fat miserable man with lanky hair poking from a tricorn hat and titled him Toby Fillpot. A few years later Toby Jugs began to emerge from pottery factories.

Shakespeare’s Sir Toby Belch from “Twelfth Night”, who in the play is portrayed as an excessive drinker, is thought by some to be the source of the famous jug, but he just doesn’t have the portly misery of Mr Fillpot.

As time passed and more jugs were made, the grim face of Toby cheered up a little, particularly in examples like “The Sailor” and “Hearty Good Fellow”. The name, though, stuck, even when famous faces such as Winston Churchill appeared on these jugs, they remained Toby Jugs.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Suzie Cooper

Recently, during a house contents valuation I was conducting for Probate purposes in Clay Cross, near Chesterfield, I came across one of the most extensive collections of Susie Cooper ceramics I have ever seen. I have always been a take it or leave it sort of chap when it comes to Susie Cooper, but when i saw her talent en masse I have to say my opinion changed to one of admiration.

Susie Cooper was one of the most successful designers of the twentieth century. Born in 1902, she joined local potter A. E. Gray & Co. Ltd to gain the experience she required to attend London’s Royal College of Art. Initially Cooper was a production line painter, but her talent was quickly spotted and instead of going to London she became a designer at Gray’s.

Cooper was influenced by many artists, but her contribution to the company was highly personal. Gray’s used the factory mark “Designed by Susie Cooper” to identify her work and this early work of flowers and chintzware is still very popular with collectors.

By 1929 Susie Cooper had left Gray’s and set up on her own in premises at the Chelsea Works, Burslem. Products made after her departure from Gray’s are marked “A Susie Cooper Production”. However, in 1931, after interest from Wood & Sons, she moved to a larger studio at their Crown Works and products were then marked with the familiar leaping deer, that is most often associated with her.

The 1930s were the most dazzling years for Cooper and the high demand for her work led to her use of lithography at a time when most firms were still using mechanical decoration.

By the late 1930s Susie Cooper was producing up to 200 new designs a year, featuring banding, polka dots and stylised flowers. Patterns that were both modern and timeless such as “Patricia Rose” and “Endon” were the key to her success, appealing to a far wider audience than the work of many of her contemporaries.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

1905 FA Cup

When Harry Hampton woke up on the morning of April 15th 1905 he was both nervous and excited, but also, somewhere deep inside, he felt lucky. Today was the day he was going to join his teammates at Aston Villa, so that together they could knock seven bells out of Newcastle United and the team could lift the FA Cup.

Well, in front of a crowd of 101,117 roaring football fans, Harry went on to score both goals in the 2-0 win Aston Villa secured over their rivals Newcastle United. They lifted the trophy and somewhere in the crowd, cheering himself hoarse, was the owner of a programme from the game which was brought into our saleroom last week. Just think, all those years ago, our programme was in the pocket of one of the fans, who stood on the terraces at Crystal Palace, in 1905 and watched Harry score those goals.

There is something slightly different about our programme though……. In those “good old days” unscrupulous fellows produced cheaply forged copies of the big match programmes and their associates stood outside the ground and sold them to unsuspecting fans, for large profits. It only happened for big games as the smaller matches wouldn’t have had the crowds to make the whole exercise viable.

We have a Football Programmes and Sporting Memorabilia Auction on September 2nd and this wonderful 1905 programme will be one of the exciting lots included and we are expecting it to realise many hundreds of pounds.

Our own football Guru and sporting memorabilia specialist, Robert Lea told me that a genuine programme from that game would make considerably more, possibly between five and eight thousand pounds. It seems strange to me, a man who doesn’t collect football programmes, that there should be such a difference in the two values. Both were produced at the same time, both witnessed Harry’s two goals and both cost an Edwardian fan some of their hard earned cash.

As a footnote; well played Harry Hampton.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Stanhopes

The television programme that all antiques enthusiasts love to watch, The Great Antiques Hunt, occasionally finds its way onto the 14” screen in the Dowse House sitting room and occasionally we watch it. I find it very entertaining, especially when we are on it. One programme recently screened (possibly not too recently recorded though) featured one of the hunter’s with a Stanhope. A lovely novelty.

Stanhopes are small, novelty mementos that contain a miniature peephole revealing a mystery photograph. The Stanhope is a lens just millimetres wide to which one or more minute photographs, which look like black pinheads, are attached. When held up to the light the lens magnifies the micro-photograph as if it was projected onto a screen.

The name Stanhope came from Charles Stanhope, the third Earl Stanhope, who invented a uniquely powerful magnifying lens. However, it wasn’t until well after Stanhope’s death that his invention was adapted for these souvenirs.

It was a Frenchman, Rene Dragon, who combined Stanhope’s lens with Englishman John Benjamin Dancer’s micro-photography in 1860 to produce a tiny viewer with an image attached to a lens. He quickly realised the potential and began fitting these viewers into everyday objects.

Victorians bought into the Stanhope with untold ferocity and their popularity continued until the early twentieth century. By the mid twentieth century they had almost died out except for special occasions such as the Coronation of Elizabeth II.

Stanhopes are a great theme for the novice collector as they are relatively inexpensive and yet extremely interesting.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Tea Caddies

Isn’t it funny how our habits change as we age. As a young man the only hot beverage I ever consumed was coffee, ‘stand your spoon up’ strong with a splash of milk. As I graduated into middle age, the coffee became a little weaker and a cup of tea was occasionally taken at breakfast time. As I progress further on life’s path, tea is pretty much the order of the day, ‘stand your spoon up’ strong with a splash of milk.

When tea was introduced into Europe in the 17th century it’s popularity rocketed, unheard of profits were made and tea caddies were born. The caddy was such a useful item as it could be kept in the drawing room under the beady eye of the mistress of the house and it could be locked.

Early imported tea was prohibitively expensive for all but the richest in the land, so early caddies were more often than not beautifully made and extremely expensive. The first examples were imported Chinese porcelain and styled like a ginger jar. They had a sliding top enabling tea to be poured in and a rounded cap facilitating easy measurement of a portion.

As tea drinking progressed through the 18th century it’s popularity increased and so did the tea caddies that kept it safe. Originally blue and white Chinese porcelain they were now to be found in wood, Sterling silver, brass and copper. By far the most commonly seen in the salerooms today are the wooden examples. These are a delight to collect, from the plain rectangular to the sumptuous casket. The slightly larger examples had three sections and were fitted with a central blending bowl to mix and blend.

As the 19th century progressed so the price of tea came down. This meant the lock on the caddy disappeared and gradually the tea went from the drawing room to the kitchen and the poor old caddy disappeared for ever.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Children’s Books

As a young father, many years ago, one of my greatest joys was reading bedtime stories. I actually loved most of the stories, but really, really loved the voices I invented for all the characters. I thought the children all loved the voices too, but, as with so many things in life, I was wrong, they did and still do, love the stories though.

I think loving the stories so much is why the children’s book is always so popular in the saleroom. They are timeless and nostalgic and collectors love them. There are only so many that sell for high prices though.

If you are lucky enough to possess a first edition of Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone this is a valuable item. When Bloomsbury came to print it in 1997 they feared they would make a loss and the print run was very small. The perfect scenario for a marvellous investment, a rare book with a big future demand. Further print runs were needed for that book and so future Harry Potter books had enormous first print runs. The investment opportunity was never repeated.

From the modern to the Victorian. Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland was first published by MacMillan in 1865 with illustrations from Punch cartoonist John Tenniel. Carroll’s classic is constantly inspiring illustrators to rework the story. Many collectors collect for illustrators and will follow the same story through its many different versions.

Book sales can be hugely influenced by a film version of the said book and this effect can feed into demand for first editions of related titles. For example Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and a signed first edition of the precursor to the trilogy, The Hobbit, breaking auction records

Those are just three examples which hopefully illustrate three different ways a book can have value.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Penny Toys

As grandchildren continue to be born and so the Dowse dynasty continues to expand, the wallet of the Patriarch no longer has time to grow a moth, never mind a colony, like it used to. Birthdays and Christmas are bad enough, but then there are all those other things…… If only we still had the penny toy.

Cheaply made from pressed tin and very easy to break, these small toys, measuring no longer than five inches, were affordable to all as they really were sold for just a penny by many street pedlars and market stalls who still made a good profit on them.

Penny toys were in production from the 1860s but peaked in popularity around 1900, largely due to the process of transfer colour lithography that was widely available by 1890. It enabled fine detail and colour to be added to sheets of tinplate very quickly and economically making the toys very bright, exciting and desirable to children.

Many of the Penny toys were produced by well-known toy manufacturers and largely in Germany. German-based Distler, for example, started off as a penny tinplate toy manufacturer before expanding its range.

Penny toys were very small and that actually made them quite difficult for children to play with, especially where the toy involved a tiny detachable piece, like a0 driver, which was tricky to take in and out of a car. Vehicles were a dominant subject matter for Penny toys; they would all move, some needed pushing while the more sought after were fitted with a flywheel allowing them to propel themselves. Penny toys were quite often tiny replicas of larger, more expensive tinplate toys on sale at the time.

There is a good collectors’ market for Penny toys, with very good or mint condition being the most important element in value, closely followed by rarity. Early examples tend to be more popular as the quality of production did decline over time as demand grew. Fine lithography and interesting or intricate designs are also keenly collected.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Dinky ‘Hovis’ Delivery Van

When Covid is a little more under control and we can once again have great big family gatherings and one family decides to play guess the advert, how quickly would they guess from the words “a cobbled hill” and “a boy with a bike”? Pretty quickly I would say. Now I can take or leave the Hovis bread loaf, to me it tastes much the same as the next loaf, but the Hovis Boy with a Bike advert is one of my all time favourites.

Those days between the wars are perfectly remembered in forty seconds of commercial television and during the time the advert is portraying, Dinky were producing a series of delivery vans for the delivery boy to dream of driving.

The series I refer to is Series 28 and it was produced between 1935 and 1936 with letters after the number corresponding to the advertising logo on the van side. One such van had a Hovis logo on its side. That was van 28x.

The problem with cars and vans produced by Dinky between the wars is not only that they have had over eighty years of sticky fingers and sandpits, but also that a great many of them suffered from metal fatigue. Briefly this is the inclusion in the metal mixture of impure alloys and it led to corrosion, cracking and crumbling of the vehicles. This was particularly common between 1938 and 1941, but for some reason also badly affected Series 28.

Taking all that into account it is no wonder, therefore, that our toy specialist John Morgan was very excited at the prospect of selling a series 28 ‘Hovis’ delivery van, with only slight fatigue. John is very easily excited, as I expect most toy specialists are, but when it exceeded the top estimate of £250 to sell for £806, including buyers premium, he was, as the dictionary defines, in a heightened state of energy. Collectors just love rarity and nostalgia, even with a bit of crumbling.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.

Duesbury Derby

When John Noakes was a presenter on Blue Peter it was one of the finest periods in the history of Blue Peter. When Jaguar produced the E-type Jaguar it was one of the finest periods in their history and when Kellogg’s Rice Krispies first snapped, crackled and popped onto the shop shelves in 1928 many said it was the best period for the Kellogg company.

Every company has its finest period and the same can be said for the Derby Porcelain Factory.It all began in 1786 when William Duesbury the younger succeeded his father and steered the factory through its best and most significant period. The young William was a multi talented man. He possessed a wonderful eye and an enviable appreciation of the artistic, but almost as important were his very effective managerial skills. Production was aimed at only the wealthiest customers with every piece finished to the very highest standard.

Derby specialised in cabinet wares, particularly cups and saucers or cabaret sets (too expensive to use and produced simply to be admired). Derby’s glaze was creamy white and very soft, producing a delightful and subtle feeling, unlike other English porcelain. Consequently the demand for Derby of this period today is higher than many other porcelains.

The decoration in panels or reserves was created by some superb artists including Zachariah Boreman and Thomas Hill focused on landscapes, Richard Askew famous for figures and William Billingsley, the greatest of all English flower painters. Derby rediscovered the charm of botanical designs and flower prints were also copied onto dessert services.

Sadly William Duesbury died far too soon, at only 34, but he left a factory which had become one of the finest in Europe.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering in auction, or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website.