Hummel Figures

To the collector the value of their collection is often the last thing thing they are concerned about and I have often thought that an ideal subject for a new collector would be the charming Hummel figures of children. They can be acquired at reasonable cost and they are a vast and interesting subject.

These endearing figures were developed from drawings by a Franciscan nun Berta Hummel drawn for the Goebel Company in Bavaria. Introduced in 1935 Hummel’s figures were an instant success. By the time she died in 1946 she had drawn around 600 sketches, which was enough to keep the company producing Hummel figures for decades.

Hummels from the 1950s and 1960s are the cheapest on the market. Earlier pieces, groups and larger figures are more desired and so more expensive. The more recent or common a figure is, the more vital the condition becomes in determining value.

Many of the figures are made in more than one version. For example, “Weary Wanderer” was first produced in 1949 but has been made regularly ever since. The rather rare version with blue eyes is more valuable than all the others. Also “Puppy Love” which is one of the first models to be produced and therefore rare and valuable still has a rarer and even more collectable example which faces right instead of left.

Factory marks help in dating Hummels. During the 1930s the firm used a script “Goebel” mark under a crown. After 1950 a “V” mark with a small bee was used and from 1960 the bee became further stylised as a simple dot with triangular wings.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Eric Ravilious

I adore Christmas and New Year beyond measure, but I also adore getting back to work. I love the anticipation and excitement, wondering what I will see next, who I will meet next, what stories will there be to tell of 2020. In 2019 we sold a commemorative mug for the Coronation of King George VI in 1937. Coronation mugs usually make just a few pounds if we are lucky, but this one made £650. Why? Because it was designed for Wedgwood by Eric Ravilious.

Eric Ravilious was a very interesting man and his work is well worth collecting. He was born in 1903 and brought up in Sussex, where his parents ran an antiques shop. In 1919 he won a scholarship to Eastbourne School of Art and then in 1925 another scholarship to travel in Italy. I have never won a scholarship so am in awe of anyone who does, but anyone who wins two……

Returning from Italy with a glowing tan and a great deal more life experience Eric held his first exhibition of watercolour drawings in 1933 in London. He sold over 50%. His second exhibition at the same gallery in 1936 saw him sell 75%, an incredible success. During the 1930s Eric was staunchly anti fascist, so in addition to his own exhibitions, he lent work to the ‘Artists Against Fascism’ exhibition.

Eric was engaged as a war artist by the War Artists’ Advisory Committee in 1939 and between then and being lost in action in September 1942 he produced some of his best work. The body of Eric Ravilious was never recovered.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Rookwood Pottery

Arts and Crafts pottery became big business in America after inspiration from the European wares on show at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition in 1876 and Rookwood Potteries was where the finest examples of ‘Art Pottery’ were produced.

Rookwood was established in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1880 and from the very beginning focused on making high quality art pottery by employing the best designers and potters available. Artists such as Matt Daly, Grace Young and the Japanese ceramicist Kataro Shirayamadani worked for Rookwood as did Laura Fry who developed and patented the now famous ‘Standard’ clear glossy glaze and William P. McDonald and Matthew A. Daly who painted the highly collectable American Indian portraits.

It was the designs and quality of the decoration that secured Rookwood’s reputation of brilliance ahead of other American potteries such as Roseville, Weller and Lonhuda who were producing simple wares. Rookwood designs were largely inspired by the natural world, flowers in particular, although portraits were also used as decoration mainly the aforementioned Native Indians and the Old Masters. Rookwood was known for their subtly of tone, richness of colour and exquisite painting and these are all reasons why they are so highly desirable today. ‘Standard Brown’ ware was the first major line to come out of the pottery but huge success hit in 1894 with the release of Ariel Blue, Iris and Sea Green.

Most Rookwood pottery is signed by the artist with a date and shape number. From 1886 a RP flame mark monogram was used and each year from 1887 a flame was added to this monogram until by 1900 it had fourteen. Roman numerals were used from 1901.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

1930’s Carlton Ware

Carlton ware has for many years been one of the most popular English factories among collectors and furnishers and the 1930s to the 1960s is one of its most successful eras.

The Carlton Works was established in 1890 by James Frederick Wiltshaw and James Alcock Robinson. Based in Stoke-on-Trent, they became a highly successful and well-known manufacturer of earthenware and china. The company owed a lot of its success to their richly decorated lustre wares with Art Deco and Oriental influences but in the 1930s they branched out into something different with an emphasis on bold block colours and flower and leaf motifs.

The new designs used the floral and foliage themes either to help form the shape of the piece for example vases, bowls and trefoil dishes or as striking, embossed decoration on items such as teapots, jugs and toast racks. These new tableware ranges were hand-painted and continued in production until the 1960s. They are sometimes referred to as Salad Ware or either Floral or Fruit embossed Carlton Ware, but are easily recognizable by their eye-catching colours and bold decoration; particularly impressive when brought together as a group.

The colours used during this period were very bright and again held with the floral, natural themes including yellow, green and pink. Many different patterns were produced, particularly popular include Buttercup, Foxglove and Apple Blossom as well as Water lilies, Anemone and the Fruit Basket.

There were over fifty different patterns produced during the thirty years of production. Many patterns were made in more than one colour, like Buttercup, which is common in yellow but rare and desirable in pink. Some patterns, like Apple Blossom, had a huge range of items produced while others, like Daisy, were limited to just a handful of pieces.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Teco

Encouraged by the reception of last weeks look at some American collectables, this week we have stayed over the ocean to look at another popular collectable, namely Teco Pottery.

The American Terra Cotta Tile and Ceramics Company, which came to be known as Teco Pottery was established c.1880 in Illinois by William Day Gates. Originally it was founded to simply make wall and floor tiles but Gates was actually much more ambitious than this and saw an opportunity to produce beautiful ceramics for ordinary people at affordable prices all through the cheap medium of terracotta. The production of Teco Art Pottery began in earnest in 1902.

The classic design of Teco pieces was architectural by nature, simple clean lines in strong shapes often with buttressed handles or feet. In line with the values of the Arts and Crafts movement, surface decoration was rejected in favour of strong form, although a small number of pieces can be found with some very simple impressed or embossed panel designs. The majority of pieces made were vases, although other items like bowls and pitchers were also produced as well as some wall mounted items like planters or ‘pockets’. All Teco pottery was moulded; even the most exotic and seemingly unique shapes that look hand-formed all came from moulds. The shape of a piece does affect price, with the taller vases in particular being the most desirable with collectors today.

Green was by far the most popular colour produced by Teco. This micro crystalline glaze had very distinctive green tones with an almost silvery quality which had taken the company many years to perfect. It is the silvery grey finish that clearly distinguished it from the Grueby green ware also popular at this time. Other colours including brown, yellow, rose, grey, purple and blue were introduced from 1910 onwards.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Spode

Spode was established in 1776 in Stoke-on-Trent by Josiah Spode who wanted to set up on his own after years of working for other ceramic manufacturers. Spode is generally acknowledged as developing the first recipe for bone china. Experiments were taking place in the Spode factory from around 1796 to create fine white porcelain with a recipe containing high quantities of calcined ox-bone alongside china clay and stone; originally known as ‘Stoke China’ it was later renamed ‘Bone China’.

Josiah died suddenly in 1797 and his son, Josiah II continued his work, establishing the factory as the largest and one of the best porcelain manufacturers of the early 19th century ‘Golden Age’ of British ceramics. This included being appointed ‘Potter to the Prince of Wales’ in 1806.

As well as being recognized as creating the original bone china recipe, Spode is also highly acclaimed for the part they played in the development of transfer printing in its early days. Josiah II perfected the process of transfer printing onto earthenware, producing some of the finest blue-and-white designs ever made. Their most famous pattern is probably ‘Italian’, also known as ‘Blue Italian’ or ‘Spode’s Italian’.

The Italian pattern was first introduced in 1816 and is still produced today; it is believed to have appeared on as many as 700 different shapes across the Spode range. The origins of the classical scenes of the pattern are, unfortunately for collectors, unknown. Although many of Spode’s designs can be sourced back to pictorial scenes or prints of the time, the origins of the Italian pattern remain a mystery and despite research by many interested parties, no single Italian scene has ever been found that encompasses all the features of the pattern.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Jackfield Ware

My love of the motor car is well known amongst family, friends and colleagues and my wife has always allowed me this vice as I have no other vices whatsoever……to speak of. At present my favourite car colour is without doubt black. In the late 19th century the Victorians also developed a passion for black, obviously not in the motor car, but in many other things particularly pottery and porcelain.

The rich black pottery known as Jackfield ware was once thought to be a mere imitation of Wedgwood’s grand black basalts, but it does in fact predate this Wedgwood range and is actually one of the many experimental wares to be made at Jackfield, Shropshire as early as 1751.

The earthenware body of Jackfield ware is a brownish red colour achieved by firing red clays at high temperatures. The glaze was achieved by firing cobalt at a high temperature until the deepest blue turned black. The lustrous sheen was partly due to the carbon filled smoke, from the furnaces, being directed back into the kiln to further blacken the earthenware.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse
Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

When black glazed wares became popular in the 19th century many imitations were made and these are often mistaken for Jackfield wares. These were often made by staining earthenware black with iron oxide before firing and covering it with a clear glaze. This was a cheep alternative without the style and elegance of Jackfield but which was popular as the Victorian passion for cheap trinkets and ornament saw it made into everything from tea pots to plant pots.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Chelsea Porcelain

The Chelsea Factory was established sometime between 1743 and 1745 by Nicholas Sprimont. Sprimont’s background as a silversmith is evident in many of the Chelsea designs, particularly the early pieces. He ran a hugely successful and innovative company until 1769 when he sold to William Duesbury of the Derby Porcelain factory who maintained Chelsea until 1784, producing what is commonly referred to as Chelsea-Derby ware. In 1784, the Chelsea workshops were demolished with the majority of the moulds destroyed and a few removed to Derby along with some of the workers.

Chelsea Porcelain is very clearly divided into four periods defined by the marks used. The first period; the triangle period (1745-49) saw pieces marked with an incised triangle. Wares from this period have a glassy white body due to a proportion of crushed lead glass in the soft paste that can appear to have ‘pinholes’ in it when held to the light. Designs tended to be based on silver work with particular Rococo influence.

By the raised anchor period (1749-52) marked with an applied anchor on a small oval medallion, there had been some improvement in the quality of the glaze with less translucency. Many designs had a Meissen influence and scenes from Aesop’s Fables were popular. A small red or occasionally brown anchor defined the Red anchor period (1752-56) which saw fashions favour decorative tableware with designs such as fruit, animals and vegetables becoming popular. Figures from this period are particularly notable; the best produced by Flemish modeller Josef Willems. Finally the Gold anchor period (1757-69) where the small anchor was now painted gold saw an increased use of gilding and coloured grounds, the return to Rococo designs and many more elaborate figures produced.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse
Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Wemyss Ware

Wemyss ware was first produced by the Fife pottery in Kirkcaldy, Fife, in 1882 and was the invention of Robert Heron, pottery owner and Karel Nekola, a gifted designer from Bohemia. The name comes from the Wemyss family of Wemyss castle who were very enthusiastic patrons of the new wares.

In 1932 production moved to Bovey Pottery in Devon and under the direction of Joseph Nekola, Karel’s son, they continued to make Wemyss ware until the pottery’s closure in 1957.

Wemyss took inspiration from the British countryside with very naturalistic designs including flowers, fruit, birds and animals. They are probably most famous for the cabbage rose designs and the range of cat and pig figures. Although the pottery was successful in its day, popularity has been cemented by collectors, who included the Queen Mother, with rare examples of Wemyss ware realising very high prices at auction.

The pigs are a particular favourite of collectors with some being more prized and so more expensive to acquire. The larger pigs, up to 45cms, are very sought after and the green shamrocks and the cabbage rose decorations are the most desirable.

The pigs were designed for children’s nurseries in wealthy stately homes, being sold exclusively by Thomas Goode in Mayfair. A whole range were produced; some had slots for money, some were personalised with dates and names, some were small paperweight sized and of course some much larger. The bright, bold and colourful designs stood out against a stark white background, making these enchanting pigs very appealing to the eye.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse
Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Cornish Kitchenware

We have a number of grandchildren. Some of these grandchildren are on the Wirrall and last weekend we visited said locality and said grandchildren. I think it is fair to say that we love to see them so, so much, but with equal measure we love to say goodbye. It was between these two emotional events that I noticed my daughter still uses and displays the collection of Cornish Kitchenware jars we gave her.

True Cornishware was produced by T.G. Green of Church Gresley in Derbyshire from the 1920s onwards. The name is said to have come from one of the employees who, on returning from holiday in Cornwall, saw the new range and said that the blue was like the Cornish skies and the white was like crests of Cornish waves.

By the 1980s Cornishware had declined in popularity and the rights to make it were sold to Cloverleaf of Swindon and in 2001 to Mason Cash and Co.

Maker’s marks on the base aid identification and dating. Early marks from the 1920-1940s are printed in green. Most original Cornishware bears a printed mark in green or black, showing the church at Church Gresley and is crossed by the words ‘Cornish Kitchen Ware’.

Named jars are more collectable than plain jars and rare names like ‘Lard’ and ‘Meal’ are even more desirable. Always check the name is not a later addition. Although blue and white is the most common colour others were produced. Red is by far the rarest, because it was produced as an experiment in the 1960s and never went into full production.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website