Reminiscing

The weight is slowly settling round my midriff as I sit beside the Christmas tree with vintage Port and cheese reminiscing the highlights of a wonderful year. We have so many specialist valuers these days that when I asked them for their highlights I ended up with enough copy for most of the rest of the winter.

Firstly music. Our vinyl and pop man Stephen Flintoft, whose dulcet tones many will know from his regular radio slot told me of his unbridled excitement upon discovering an LP by the little known folk duo “Fresh Maggots”. He told me of the joy he feels on the discovery of such treasures, it’s not the price, it’s the rarity. In only average condition it soared to £650. I searched it out on Spotify and it’s dreadful.

Our wonderful jewellery specialist Sarah Clark waxed lyrical about the clarity of an amazing solitaire diamond we sold for over £10,000 and how Auction is the only way to buy a diamond. She also implored me to mention how much the classic Rolex from the 1960s has increased in popularity this year, siting one we sold in December for £14,500. (It must have its box and all the papers though. A bit like full main dealer service history)

Robert Lee, again who many will know from the television, is a hard man to keep under control when sport and particularly football is mentioned. He is especially fond of a team who live and play their football in the Barnsley area. Knowing what most of their players past and present had or used to have for breakfast he singled out a goalkeeper, Harry Hough, from 1954 when they won the third division title. Each player received a medal for that honour and we sold Harry’s this year for £1,800.

To be continued………

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website

Mount Washington Glass

Recently a stone chip on my car windscreen, which over the months I had grown to love, broke free and cracked my whole screen. Chatting to the technician who fitted my new windscreen I found he had a passion for glass collecting. When I explained the irony of this his eyes rolled and I gathered I was not the first. His favourite glass was Mount Washington.

Mount Washington was established by William Libbey in 1837 and after moving to New Bedford in 1870 began to produce American art glass for which it was hugely successful. It made some remarkable ranges and patented many types of glass.

One such glass was Burmese glass, with a satin or plush finish. This finish was created by exposing the glass to acid and it is unique in its creamy yellow and peach colourings. The peach colouring comes from a second firing when the base of the piece stays cooler and areas at the top are heated to such an extent that the peach colour reverts back to yellow giving a distinctive two-tone effect.

The creation and recipe of Burmese glass was patented by Mount Washington in 1885 and early pieces are usually very simple. Over 300 hundred shapes were created in the Burmese range and by 1888 the shapes and decoration had become more elaborate. Decoration usually consisted of enamelled or applied patterns.

In 1886 the company patented a very simple glass called ‘Peachblow’, sometimes referred to as Peachskin, which again had an attractive two-tone effect this time in pinks and greys. Unfortunately it never had the commercial success of the Burmese range and was only produced for two years, ironically making it is very collectable today.

Art glass of all types is very popular in the salerooms today and Mount Washington ranges should be on everyone’s shopping list.

Senior Valuer Michael Dowse

For more information or if you have similar items you’re thinking about offering items in auction or you simply would like a valuation, please get in touch with us, full details can be found on our company website